In March, the AWCI (Association of the Wall & Ceiling Industry) celebrated its 100th Anniversary in at its annual convention and INTEX Construction Expo in Orlando, Florida. Part of the celebration was to mark the publication of a new book to commemorate the organization’s birth in 1918; the special edition Centennial Book provides an historical overview of the wall and ceiling industry during the past 100 years.

The handsome, large-format book documents a century of industry growth with a decade-by-decade synopsis of the wall and ceiling industry, with many vintage and contemporary photographs that also tell the story.  As illustrated in the new book, wall and ceiling construction has always been a basic service; it survived the ravages of a turbulent century, continues to innovate and remains a robust industry today.

Sto Corp. was the proud sponsor of the 1920’s section of the Centennial Book; a memorable decade that started with the introduction of Prohibition and ended with the stock market crash in 1929, with flappers, Lindbergh’s pioneering trans-Atlantic flight, and the migration of Americans from farms to cities providing memorable milestones. On the wall and ceiling front, Gold Bond gypsum wallboard was introduced, and the labor movement grew in strength. The American Federation of Labor (AFL) had 5 million union members in 1920; higher pay and shorter workdays were contested issues, and skilled tradesmen were in short supply. (Sound familiar?) In 1926, 2,500 Chicago journeymen plasterers went on strike demanding a $2/day wage increase. Overall, each decade in the book provides many insights in the development of the wall and ceiling design and construction business.

As told in this industry memoir, the AWCI has taken a leading role in setting standards since its inception, facilitating union agreements, protecting and promoting the trade. As a forum for unity and direction, the AWCI has helped transform the industry into what it is today and should be applauded for its industry leadership and support for superior building standards over the past 100 years.

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