As Hurricane Lane hurdles its way toward Hawaii packing Category 4 winds, the second-part of our series on resilient design is quite timely.

Sea-level rise and catastrophic storms have clearly had serious consequences for our coastal areas and islands and will continue to do so. The cost estimates for hurricane damage in the U.S. continue to rise; they are now hovering at about $300 billion in the U.S. alone, based on last year’s three major storms. In addition to the many scientists, previously mentioned, who are focused on structural solutions to ensure more resilient design, many design professionals are also addressing these issues.

At a recent A+AIA-Architect forum, a group of award-winning architects shared insights into mitigating risk at waterfront properties and strategies for designing for a resilient future. Wanda Lau, editor of tech, practice, and products for ARCHITECT conducted the panel session with Lance J. Brown, co-chair of AIANY’s Design for Risk and Reconstruction committee; Jeremy Alain Siegel, associate and senior designer at BIG; Eric Fang, AIA, principal at Perkins Eastman; and Claire Weisz, FAIA, principal-in-charge at WXY Studio.

Treacherous coastal storm waters, flooding and water damage are as serious as the impact of wind in an extreme storm. To help us better understand the nuances of designing and constructing flood-resistant buildings and infrastructure, the New York Times offered this handy guide and glossary of terms.

We have little control over the increasing pattern of extreme weather events, but clearly professionals in our industry can make a difference by utilizing resilient design concepts and materials in new construction as well as restoration.

 

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