Architectural Trends for 2019

Architectural trends for 2019 include more sustainable and open space designs.

Here’s a quick look at the key architectural trends forecasted for 2019.

According to Build, advanced technologies and materials will continue to impact the way we design and build. We already know that augmented and virtual reality, AI and drone devices, as well as 3-D printing and other technologies, are altering construction practices — as is the trend for off-site, prefab construction.

We also know that state-of-the-art, advanced building materials and systems continue to change the landscape of the built environment, as do eco-friendly construction materials. Look for more, energy-efficient, eco-friendly architecture this year – buildings that are “greener” inside and out.

The use of recycled materials in innovative, artistic, sustainable design will continue to grow. From furniture and floors, to exterior claddings, using recycled materials means energy requirements and emissions for producing these products are significantly reduced. We are also seeing more vertical gardens and green rooftops, indoor gardens and green walls.

Other foreseeable trends include:

  • Sustainable Architecture & Resilient Design. Insulated building envelopes that provide air and moisture barriers for protection and energy efficiency, HVAC systems that conserve energy, filtration systems that conserve water – these will all get more traction as we strive to improve energy efficiency, preserve resources and alleviate the impact of climate change. With increasingly severe weather events and sea level rise, resilient design will remain an important focus for owners, designers and builders.
  • Open-space designs. As open-space design becomes even more prevalent, architects and designers are striving to better define the various segments of non-obstructed space to improve visual organization. Floor levels that vary in height along with shifts in surface colors and textures are all design strategies to produce enhanced open-space living.

 

  • Small designs. In residential design, the popularity of tiny house, micro-apartments and co-operative housing continues to rise. This in response to high cost of land and the environmental impacts of larger homes. Architects are embracing the “small but perfectly formed” architectural design challenge.
  • Solar roof tiles. While solar panels have been around forever, solar roof tiles that can convert sunlight into enough energy to power a house are the latest rage. They are less expensive than conventional solar panels, and far more attractive, as they come in many different styles that integrate seamlessly with traditional roof construction.

Work Space Architecture Will Also Continue to Change

As reported in Entrepreneur, in today’s offices, work happens anywhere and everywhere. More often than not, there is no set cubicle space. Work spaces are ergonomic and well-connected, designed for interaction and connectivity.

Working collaboratively is an ongoing trend, spawning office designs that facilitate small and large teams coming together to generate multi-disciplinary solutions.

Businesses have also figured out that health means wealth, i.e. healthy employees are more productive employees. Workspaces today must foster and encourage a healthful lifestyle, whether it’s ergonomic furniture that allows people to stand and work (versus sitting all day,) or improved interior air quality. Studies have shown that carbon dioxide and other noxious gases can cause loss of concentration and low productivity.  Proper ventilation and clean air are critical for productivity.

Lighting is also important to employee well-being. Natural light and/or lighting that mimics sunlight and adjusts to the change in time/season will also mimic bio-rhythms. The greener the building – inside and out – the healthier and happier the employee.

 


Residential Showcase Utilizes Sto Ventec Glass Facade

Architect's stunning new home in Virginia is the first to incorporate Sto Ventec exterior glass panels.

StoVentec Glass facades have been widely used in Europe for years, and are just now being introduced in the U.S. The product works well as both an external rainscreen cladding system, and as an internal decorative option.

StoVentec Glass is an advanced ventilated rainscreen cladding system consisting of a glass-faced composite panel, thermal insulation, and sub-construction. The result is an engineered, high performance façade with a sleek, elegant look.

Architect Jeff Davenport, a principal at Perkins & Will, chose such a StoVentec Glass panel system for his private residence on Lake Anna in Louisa County, Virginia. It is the first such installation in the country, and based on the stunning results, will most certainly generate future use of this versatile, highly functional product.

The contemporary plan initially called for metal panels, but the contractor on the project, Pillar Construction, suggested StoVentec Glass panels, which would provide better insulation and incredible aesthetics.  In addition to the advanced rain screen cladding with a back-ventilated system and air cavities for drainage, StoVentec Glass panels also offer thermal and sound insulation.

Opaque glass panels wrap around the entire entertainment, fireplace area as well as the garage façade.

Part of the Ventec manufacturing process includes the fusion of color onto the back of the glass. The color melts into the glass, creating permanent colored glass panels that will not wear, scratch, fade or incur water damage. Vivid colors and different panel size options are available, offering many aesthetic choices for either new-build or renovation, which you can learn about here.


Architecture Empowered by Advanced Wall Technologies

309 East Paces in Atlanta employed StoPanel Techonology to save time and money and to ensure aesthetics were preserved.

Creating the landmarks of the future…preserving the icons of the past, while staying on top of cutting-edge design and technology. These are the challenges architects face today. For more than 100 years, Sto has been working with design professionals to provide innovative materials and processes to enhance the built environment. StoPanel Technology manifests this spirit of innovation. The company’s prefabricated, insulated exterior wall systems produced in a manufacturing environment can simplify the construction and renovation process without forsaking design aesthetics.

StoPanel Technology can cut weeks (even months) out of a typical construction schedule. StoPanel cuts costs and  eliminates the need for multiple trades to be on-site since the wall sections arrive complete and can usually be installed by a relative handful of workers.The solution is also ideal for densely populated sites where there is little room for scaffolding.

One example of how StoPanel Technology saved time and money, is the restoration of an Atlanta, Georgia landmark: 309 East Paces, built in 1963 and located in the now trendy Buckhead area of the city. The owners of the 12-story building, Knox/Redan, wanted to preserve the building’s aesthetics — selecting a brick design with large industrial-style windows for the restoration. They had limited time and a tight budget.

The general contractor, Balfour Beatty Construction, used StoPanel Classic NExt ci as the cladding, incorporating StoCreativ®️ Brick and StoCreativ Granite to achieve the look of natural materials without the added cost, weight and labor.

Using StoPanel Technology saved the owners $500,000, enhanced the energy efficiency of the building and proved to be a faster and safer method of construction on the nearby busy Atlanta streets. The panels were installed in 22 working days, cutting valuable time off the schedule, eliminating weather delays, minimizing work done at high levels and reducing neighborhood disruption.

This vintage beauty with a new face provides just one example of how StoPanel Technology is revolutionizing the construction and renovation industry today.


Architectural Photography Award Finalists Announced

Sto has been a major sponsor of the prestigious Architectural Photography Awards since their inception in 2012.

The shortlist for the prestigious Architectural Photography Awards has been published and, as always, it includes an eclectic collection of breathtaking images.

Turkish photographer Omer Kanipak photographed children peering through Wolfgang Buttress’ installation, The Hive, at the Royal Botanic Gardens in England.

Hundreds of photographers from 47 countries entered in the competition which included four main categories — exterior, interior, buildings in use, and “sense of place” – all intended to showcase the artistry of architectural photography. The 20 photographs chosen as finalists will be exhibited at the World Architecture Festival in Amsterdam from November 28-30, where the winners will also be announced.

Italian photographer Marco Tagliarino entered an image of the historic Piazza Duomo designed by Italo Rota into the Sense of Place category.

The 20 stunning photographs chosen as finalists include a seashore chapel in Qinhuangdao, northeast China, as well as an abandoned power station in Budapest, the timber-clad lobby of Bloomberg’s European headquarters, and a provocative shot of swimmers wading into waters where the Yangtze and Jialing rivers meet in Chongqing, China with the site of a modern new building complex by Safdie Architects looming in the background. Two of the final photos were inspired by the same architectural wonder — The Hive in London — and both images could not be more disparate.

British photographer James Newton captured ‘The Vortex’ — a timber lobby in Bloomberg’s European headquarters in London.

An expert panel of judges will select winners in the four categories as well as in two additional areas: Portfolio and Mobile. The new Portfolio category asked for 46 photographs of one architectural project and the Mobile category (as you no doubt surmised) called for photographs taken on mobile devices.

Since its inception in 2012, the Architectural Photography Award program has grown in global stature. Thanks for this go to the World Architecture Festival and to Sto – a façade and interior system manufacturer; Sto has been an ardent supporter and sponsor of the competition from the very beginning.


Sto Werkstatt Launches Pop-Up Exhibitions & Speaker Series

Sto Werkstatt in London which has been a resource for architects and builders the past 5 years, is taking their show on the road with pop-up exhibitions, speaker events and other forums for industry leaders.

What are the next generation of architects and designers thinking these days? Stay tuned and look for an upcoming Werkstatt program in your virtual neighborhood.

After five successful years of hosting events at the Sto Werkstatt studio and materials library at Clerkenwell in London, the company has closed its studio and is taking its programs on the road. Starting earlier this year, they launched a new “nomadic” program of exhibitions, talks, project consultations along with their Sto Materials sample service.

The first such program of “Sto Werkstatt Presents” was in July of this year in London, with David Thulstrup, a Danish master in the composition of material, color and form, and Ellie Stathaki, Architecture Editor of Wallpaper* discussing “Designing for Wellness & Wonder”. This first pop-up speaker program organized by Sto Werkstatt revolved around an earlier exhibition in Milan at Salone del Mobile where Sto showcased their StoSilent acoustical panel system. Thulstrup discussed how the sensual qualities of materials and design can contribute to comfort and livability within the built environment as demonstrated at the Milan salon.

These Sto pop-up installations in the U.K. will continue to be a valuable resource for architects and the building industry, providing inspiration and knowledge. The rest of us will be able to tap these global trends online. The goal for Sto is to work closely with design professionals — offering specifications, details and advice that is tailored to a project’s geographical location and environmental requirements.

For more information on Sto Werkstatt standard and bespoke materials library as well as upcoming exhibitions and events —


Skyscrapers Reach for New Heights

According to a recent study, skyscrapers are going to continue reaching for the stars and with this high rise building trend, the value of prefab, insulated wall panels will increase.

As reported in Durability & Design a new study looking at socio-economic trends over the next 30 years suggests that the construction of skyscrapers will continue to climb. Estimates are that around the globe there will be 6,800 skyscrapers per 1 billion people compared to 800 skyscrapers per 1 billion people today.

The recent study by Jonathan Auerback and Phyllis Wan also predicts that future skyscrapers will stand 50 percent taller than those towering above us today. This forecast is not startling if you consider increasing population density in urban centers. After all, going “up” is about the only option for accommodating more people in the same amount of ground space.

 AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili

According to the study, the construction and average height of skyscrapers has increased steadily over the years. In 1950, they tended to average close to 500 feet tall (or 40 floors); those numbers have gone up 8% every year since then, and the average height of a skyscraper today has doubled. If this pattern continues, the number of skyscrapers will outpace the 2 percent annual growth of urban populations, and by 2050, an additional 41,000 skyscrapers will have been constructed.

There are some really tall buildings out there now, such as the Burj Khalifa (828 meters tall in Dubai), and there is every indication skyscrapers will continue reaching for the heavens.  The Jeddah Tower (Saudi Arabia) which will be finished in 2020, will be 1,000 meters tall.  The other interesting statistic that emerged from the study is that as the height of skyscrapers increases, the number of floors tends to decrease as the floor heights expand. So, in 2050, skyscrapers will be 50% taller than today,  but will not have 50% more floors.

Urban planners and architects acknowledge that as the global population continues to increase, vertical growth can be used to accommodate the additional density. This vertical momentum will also drive trends in the construction and building material industries, trends which are already emerging today, such as prefab panelization.

Hi-rise construction and buildings towering at great heights will require structural building solutions such as the manufactured, insulated exterior wall systems entering the marketplace today.  Durable and lightweight systems with continuous insulation can install in less time with less manpower and can require less maintenance once in place, while also providing more energy efficiency and durability.  Working at high elevations can be complicated and dangerous; prefab panels can help minimize these risks, simplify the installation process, and expedite building times while ensuring quality.

As our buildings collectively reach for the clouds, emerging technologies will continue to revolutionize the construction industry. Clearly, prefabricated panel solutions will play an important role in this evolution.