Designing buildings with the future in mind

Designing buildings with the future in mind

If it’s excitement, optimism, concern, or tinges of all three, everyone has a worldview of what the future holds. While those working in building design don’t have a crystal ball, there’s a plethora of opportunity for experts in this field to take advantage of innovations and mitigate foreseen humanitarian risks.


Office design trends for 2019: Keeping the multi-generational workforce engaged

office design trends 2019

With the influx of Millennials and Generation Y fully immersing themselves in today’s workforce, this cohort and its evolving needs are interacting with more-entrenched Generation X and Baby Boomers. Combined with increased awareness regarding wellness initiatives, sustainability and the ever-evolving world of technology, there is a fascinating impact on the world of office design as we know it in 2019.


What are consumers looking for in luxury hotel design?

What are consumers looking for in luxury hotel design?

There’s never been more options for the consumer in terms of where to stay when they travel. This has hoteliers needing ever-more to stand out and ensure the guest experience far outweighs that of a cheaper Airbnb rental. Because of this, hotel design is now playing a bigger role in a hotelier’s marketing strategy.


Exploring the future of building materials

StoCoat Lotusan exterior coating

The StoCoat Lotusan exterior coating possesses a highly water-repellent surface similar to that of the lotus leaf. Its microstructure has been modeled on the lotus plant to minimize the contact area for water and dirt. The surface additionally offers enhanced hydrophobic properties.

With the commercial and residential building sector accounting for 39 per cent of CO2 emissions in the United States per year, building owners, occupants and the public are showing interest in building materials that are not only aesthetically pleasing but safe for the planet.


Award Winning Architectural Proposals that Speak to the Future

An award winning architectural concept for a hydroelectric canal to protect a low-lying harbor area in Boston from flooding and sea level rise. Photo: Paul Lukez Architecture

A recent CNN story showcased this year’s most innovative architectural concepts – they haven’t yet been built, but these designs are being lauded for addressing the biggest challenges facing architects in the next decade, including climate change and aging populations.

The inaugural WAFX Prizes, created in conjunction with the World Architecture Festival (WAF), honor concepts that address sustainability, smart cities, building technology and cultural identity. “Everything architects do is about the future, even if it’s a restoration project,” said WAF’s program director, Paul Finch.

The award winning architectural proposals include a wooden tower in Nigeria, a community food center in Hawaii and an industrial building in Norway repurposed into a greenhouse and social hub. The overall prize went to the US firm Paul Lukez Architecture for its proposed hydroelectric canal in Boston, which also won in the climate, energy and carbon category. Designed to protect Boston’s low-lying harbor area from flooding, the project would restore almost 25 million square feet of salt marshes to create a sustainable neighborhood. In the case of rising tides or storm surges, the canal system would channel water toward recreational parks which double as reservoirs. Hydroelectric turbines would also provide clean energy to residents.

The development would use tides and infrastructure to generate renewable energy — a new urban design that would make this area of Boston more resilient to climate change. The firm believes that their design concepts can be applied to other cities at risk from rising sea levels.