Building development for disaster resilience

Building development for disaster resilience

Disaster resilience refers to the ability of buildings to prepare, plan and recover from natural disasters. These strategies can pay off, especially for buildings that are located in areas that are more subject to natural disasters.


Aloha from Sto at the Pacific Building Trade Expo

Sto will be exhibiting at the Pacific Building Trade Expo in Hawaii -- Stop by Booth #555p and meet their building material experts.

Sto Corp is a proud sponsor of the 2018 Pacific Building Trade Expo at the Hawaii Convention Center in Honolulu on November 14, where they will also be exhibiting. The Trade Expo is held in conjunction with the 3-day Hawaii Design Symposium that has been presented by the AIA and Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) for the past 19 years. The Symposium will bring together some of the most creative architects, landscape architects, planners and design professionals in Hawaii as well as the Northwest and Pacific Region. They will explore this year’s symposium theme: Building Voices: Livable Cities & Communities. The primary focus areas will be: Design in Coastal and Extreme Climatic Conditions; Healthy Citizens & Communities; Community Mobility & Housing for All. Over 300 local and national vendors will be presenting at the Expo, including Sto Corp (Booth #555p). Sto will be showcasing StoTherm ci systems, StoGuard air and moisture barrier, Sto RapidGuard, and Turbostick– products and solutions to address some of the key issues being discussed at the expo seminars on resilient design and city planning. Admission to the expo is free to all AEC industry professionals. It’s a good excuse to grab your swimsuit and sun screen and head for the islands!


Hurricane Restoration and Planning for the Next One

Condominum complex damaged in hurricane argues for resilient design solutions to mitigate damage from storm winds.

Hurricane force winds are relentless and, as we’ve learned, they do not differentiate or discriminate. Any structure in the storm’s path may be at risk, and while no building is entirely safe, some are more resistant to damage than others due to resilient design and construction. So, in the aftermath of a devastating storm, it behooves property owners to carefully assess damaged structures and consider restoration and repairs that will mitigate future storm damage. Whether the plan is to repair, restore or rebuild a storm-ravaged building, there are many solutions today that can help withstand high winds and water damage in the future. In many cases, a relatively small up-front investment can result in big future savings based on losses avoided. The weather’s not getting better, but builders are getting smarter Hurricane protection used to be limited to building on pillars to elevate a structure above the flood zones, using wind-resistant concrete block construction and putting up hurricane shutters. Well, we’re a long way from Kansas Toto, and the art of hurricane protection for the built environment has come a long way since then. New high-performance materials and components and improved construction methods offer much greater resistance to the forces of nature that cause damage. Builders who adopt the best technology for resilient construction and restoration — before and after a hurricane — can help ensure that commercial structures better withstand nature’s fury Today’s state-of-the-art building materials can help fortify structures against hurricane hazards: winds, flying debris, and flooding from rain or storm surges. Cost-effective, hurricane-resistant building materials and technology do exist and can help the built environment withstand these extreme weather events. When windows burst from high winds, buildings can pressurize as wind rushes in, popping off the roof. New roof attachment methods can add strength, and spray-foam adhesives (which are applied on the inside of the house’s roof and double as insulation) are rated for higher wind speeds. To deal with flooding, hydrostatic vents can allow water into the home but stop floodwaters from accumulating, potentially degrading its walls and foundation. A few basic structural upgrades can make for improved performance and help keep coastal structures safe including: properly designed footings, pilings and flow-through designs, a continuous load path to resist wind uplift; strong lateral bracing (or engineered shear walls) to resist the sideways pressure of wind; hardened or protected windows and doors to resist penetration by wind-borne debris. There are also exterior cladding options to protect against storm winds, water intrusion, and wind-borne debris — the leading causes of building envelope failure in hurricanes. Most of these systems can be installed economically on a variety of construction types, including metal frame with gypsum sheathing, wood or steel […]


Baha Mar: A Sto Showcase In The Bahamas

The Baha Mar Resort & Casino in the Bahamas is a signature Sto project showcasing the versatility and resiliency of the company's exterior insulation systems and finishes -- products that which were used extensively and exclusively throughout the 1,000 acre mega-project.

The Baha Mar Resort & Casino on the island of New Providence in the Bahamas opened last year with great fanfare and has been a showcase for Sto products used in its construction. Located on Cable Beach, outside the city of Nassau, the new resort was heralded as the largest hospitality project ever built in the Caribbean. The property covers over 1,000 acres including half a mile of prime beach frontage. The sprawling tropical megacomplex which cost a reported $3.4 billion to build, includes three world-renowned luxury hotel brands: Grand Hyatt, SLS and Rosewood (2,300 rooms in all). It also boasts a conference center and casino (150 tables and 1,500 machines), a spa, racquet club and 18-hole signature golf course designed by Jack Nicklaus. There will ultimately be a total of 11 pools, 42 restaurants and bars, and 60,000 square feet of retail with luxury purveyors such as Tiffany’s, Bulgari and Rolex. Oh, and let us not forget the 250 palm trees. The world-class destination resort is an imposing and impressive landmark on this small Caribbean island. It encompasses three million square feet of construction, 6,000 tons of structural steel, 500,000 sq. ft. of glass, and an abundance of StoTherm exterior insulation (more than 16,000 bags of basecoat alone) and Sto finish products including Stolit® Milano. The project initially called for stucco exteriors, but when Baha Mar consultants visited the nearby Atlantis resort on Paradise Island and saw the aesthetic caliber and versatility of the exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) used there, as well as the weather- and moisture-resistant properties of EIFS, the specs for Baha Mar were recalibrated. The competition between building material suppliers vying for the job was fierce, but in the end Sto prevailed. The general contractor CSCEC (China State Construction and Engineering Company) and the project owners were impressed with the personal involvement of Sto’s management team and the company’s tailored solutions. According to Jorge Angel, the Bahamian contractor and applicator who worked on the project for over 5 years, “Sto was chosen due to the quality, versatility and range of their EIFS product line, but also due to their strong presence and reputation worldwide, as well as the caliber of their personalized, hands-on customer service.” “Having Sto as our allies on this project was the key to our success. They were a tremendous resource” said Angel. His company, KHS&S-iLand (a joint venture between KHS&S contractors in Tampa, Florida and iLand Applicators in the Bahamas), had a huge challenge taking on such a large project on a small Caribbean island. They were working with Chinese, Colombian and American management crews talking in three different languages and all working for the largest construction company in the world (the […]